LOMPOC FCI

A low-security with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp.

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DESCRIPTION

The Federal Correctional Institution in Lompoc is a low-security prison for men. It is situated on the Lompoc Complex. The Lompoc comples includes a medium-security prison for men, and an adjacent minimum-security federal prison camp. I was confined in the minimum-security camp. As such, I spent a little time in every one of the federal prisons. The climate is great. The living environment is what a person makes of it. Learn from one person who served time in the low. If you’re going to a prison in Lompoc, send us your observations.

Inmate Gender: Offenders

Population:1,246 Total Inmates 
1246 Inmates at the FCI 
0 Inmates at the Camp

Judicial District: CA

County: SANTA BARBARA

BOP Region: Western Region

User Reviews

  • 1. My name is:Danny Navarro / DannyNavarro.kw@gmail.com
  • 2. I arrived on:I arrived at the federal prison I arrived at Lompoc Low in 2007
  • 3. I’m scheduled to leave on:I left the federal prison (approximate date): I finished serving my sentence in June of 2012.
  • 4.My judge sentenced me to serve how many months? My judge sentenced me to serve how many months? My judge sentenced me to serve a sentence of 120 months for drug-related charges. When I was young, my neighborhood influenced me to a life of crime. I didn’t think prison was a big deal. Most of friends and family members had gone to prison. When I went inside, I knew a lot of people and I wanted to adjust with them. I stayed in that mindset for 2.5 years, then I changed. I began pursuing success.
  • 5. In the past, I’ve been confined at the following institutions:In the past, I’ve been confined at the following institutions: I was in the Federal Detention Center in Los Angeles. Then I transferred to the Federal Correctional Institution at Victorville. And from there, I transferred to FCI Lompoc. I was in the medium-security prison for about eight months because the BOP staff messed up on my custody and classification score. Then they transferred me to the low-security prison.
  • 6. I was convicted of the following offense:I pleaded guilty to drug trafficking charges.
  • 7. Pros of the facility:Also, Lompoc is in Santa Barbara county, and there was a lot of natural beauty. You could eucalutys trees. We were close to the ocean and we could smell the sea. The weather is awesome. I am from Los Angeles, so my family could visit. I had some friends there. I didn’t feel threatened. I felt as if I was preparing my life for success.

    In fact, I frequently say, that I don’t regret anything. The struggles through prison made me stronger. Now I use my lessons from prison as a testimonial for good. I speak in schools, sharing my story. All of that began when I was at Lompoc. I look forward to sharing this story with others because I know that they can benefit from hearing my story. They benefit when they hear someone who went through prison, but came out strong.

  • 8. Cons of the facility:The biggest struggle is I was separated from family. I mean I was young. I was missing the things that keep a young man alive. You know what I mean. I was missing women. I was missing my family. I didn’t like being in prison. I didn’t have any money and I could do what I wanted to do. Still, I had a choice. I could choose to cry, or I could choose to be strong. And I chose the path of strength. So even the struggles had their benefits.
  • 9.Food assessment of the facility:I didn’t like the food too much. We had cheeseburgers once a week. We had chicken. We had a lot of rice and beans and some hot dogs. Prison is okay. Food is not so great. But, it makes me appreciate a great meal out here now.
  • 10.Recreational opportunities at the facility:I stayed in really good shape. We had a weight pile that was pretty food. Working out became a release valve for me. I lifted weights regularly, and I ran a lot. I got my bench up to 315 and felt pretty good about that. I ran my longest distances in prison, crushing through a 10-mile goal. I felt like I was making it happen in there. I was preparing my life for something greater. And I’m grateful for the experience. Now I try to pass the message along to others.
    • 11.Programs available in the facility:Prison offered college, but only to those who were willing to work for it. In fact, the prison makes college available—but it doesn’t really encourage people. It takes a strong will to reject the criminal lifestyle and the criminal thinking, and the negativity. I chose to participate in programs because I made a personal commitment to succeed. Nothing happens without discipline and a personal drive. That is what I teach others. I am always striving to prove worthy of these opportunities that come my way, and the reality is that we always have opportunities. Prison is about being resourceful. It’s about creating our own programs. Learn to read. Learn to write. Learn to kick ass.
    • 12.Best jobs in the facility:The best jobs are the jobs that allow us to work on our own projects. I had a great job. It was picking up trash. I know that doesn’t sound like much. But it had benefits. I could pick up a few bags. Throw them into the dumpster. Then I was free to read. I was free to study. I was free to work on my fitness. I didn’t mind to work, but I didn’t want to work for the prison.
    • 13.Living Quarters in the facility:We lived in dorms. The living quarters were like the military. It was one big room with a few rows of bunk beds. It was okay, about as clean as it could be, considering that more than 1,000 men were locked up inside those cages. The bathrooms were always dirty. The showers were private, with stalls. But still, they always seemed croweded and a little dirty. But I got used to it. Could’ve been worse.
    • 14.How would I assess safety in the facility? :I felt safe. Still, it was prison. Some people wanted to become shot callers in the prison. Some people wanted to get involved in extortion and stupid prison games. But if a guy wanted to avoid it, he could his way to avoid it—for the most part.
    • 15.What types of pressure did I feel in the facility?:I felt some pressure when I was there because I ran with the South Siders. Sometimes they wanted me to do things that I didn’t really want to do. I kind of had to roll with them. I tried to stay away to the best of my ability. Still, I didn’t know how to get away from my past. And I grew up with Southsiders. So I had to roll with the South Siders. And their values weren’t always the same as what I learned from Napelon Hill.
    • 16.What is my general review?:Generally speaking, I would say, don’t do things that lead you to prison. But if you have to serve time, I hope that you’ll find an opportunity to grow. I created those opportunities when I was at Lompoc.
    • 17.On a scale of 1 to 10, I’d give the facility a rating of:8
    • 18.Personal Blog:Yes. I would like to say that life presents struggles. It also presents opportunities. I went through struggle of imprisonment. But I learned how to rebound. Now I am living as a successful real estate agent. I sell millions of dollars worth of houses each year. I am giving back to my community by speaking in schools. I consider every opportunity to share my story as a blessing, but also a responsibility. I want to give back. And I want to show others how to become successful.

    LOMPOC FCI

    A low security with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp.

    Find Us

    3600 GUARD ROAD, LOMPOC, CA 93436

     

    Phone

    805-736-4154

     

    Email

    LOX/ExecAssistant@bop.gov

    HOW TO SEND THINGS HERE

    Freight and non-USPS parcels

    STAFF NAME

    LOMPOC FCI

    Federal Correctional Institution

    3600 GUARD ROAD

    LOMPOC, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93436

    Inmate Mail

    INMATE NAME & REGISTER NUMBER

    LOMPOC FCI

    Federal Correctional Institution

    3600 GUARD ROAD

    LOMPOC, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93436

    Inmate Money
    Do NOT send money to an inmate using this facility’s address. All funds sent through the mail must be addressed to a processing center in Des Moines, Iowa. This applies to all Federal inmates, regardless of where they are incarcerated.

    Staff Mail

    STAFF NAME

    LOMPOC FCI

    Federal Correctional Institution

    3600 GUARD ROAD

    LOMPOC, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93436

    Visiting Schedule

    FCI General Visiting Hours*

    Sunday
    8:30 AM – 3:00 PM
    Saturday
    8:30 AM – 3:00 PM
    Federal Holiday
    8:30 AM – 3:00 PM

    FCI CAMP Visiting Hours*

    *About Visiting Hours

    lompoc federal prisons
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