Blog Article 

 Teaching in Prison 

Michael Santos

Michael Santos

To help people in prison develop skills that will translate into success, we create new lessons regularly. We offer those courses to administrators. Thanks to supporting administrators, more than 100,000 people learn from our courses each year

How Teaching in Prison Becomes Effective

People pursue careers in corrections because they want to make a positive contribution to society. To succeed at teaching courses in prison, leaders need great resources. Our team at Prison Professors creates new resources every day. We create strategies that help people understand the importance of:

  • Developing verbal communication skills,
  • Developing better writing skills,
  • Developing better critical-thinking skills,
  • Developing a self-directed work ethic.

When people in jail or prison learn how others overcame struggles or worked to build successful careers, they get inspired.

Our team provides teachers with those resources.

Our Process for Teaching in Prison

Our courses begin with a video interview. Then, we profile people that meet one of several categories:

  • People that lead businesses and create jobs
  • People that served time in prison and emerged successfully
  • People that want to improve outcomes at every stage of America’s criminal justice system.

After creating a video interview of between 50 and 57 minutes, we work with the person we profile in the interview to create an extensive lesson plan.

Each lesson plan includes a series of self-directed lessons. Those lessons include:

  • Vocabulary building exercises
  • Exercises to help people improve writing skills
  • Lessons to challenge people’s critical-thinking skills.

Our lessons teach people how to pursue self-directed learning strategies. Participants find pathways to prepare for higher levels of success through prison and beyond.

Teaching in prison becomes easier with courses from Prison Professors. More than 100,000 people in jails and prisons across America work through our courses.

Lesson Examples for Teaching in Prison:

Scott: Teaching B to B Sales

  • Scott reveals the steps he took to build a career as a professional of selling from one business to another business.

David: Teaching How to Build a Career in Real Estate Investments

  • David has built a career buying and selling real estate. He teaches people how to earn a living in real estate.

Ryan: Building a Trucking Company

  • Ryan reveals the strategies he used to build his own trucking company, starting with one truck and building a company with multiple trucks.

Erin: Book Keeping

  • Erin shows us the steps she took to become a skilled book keeper and accountant. People in prison could use their time to develop the same skills.

Casey: Building a Roofing Company

  • Despite not responding well to schoool, Casey developed an outstanding work ethic. With a few hundred dollars, he built a roofing company that grew to employ more than 100 people.

Bill: Building a Digital Marketing Agency

  • Despite facing challenges as an at-risk adolescent, Bill found his way by learning art and technology. He trained himself to build web pages. Then, he built a digital marketing business to help business owners grow their customer base with search-engine optimization techniques.

Dr. Jeff: Creating Plans to Succeed

  • Dr. Jeff Gallups gives us an overview of an extraordinary life. As a child, he aspired to become a physician. That vision put him on path that influenced study habits. After earning credentials to practice medicine, he leveraged his success to become a real estate investor and an entrepreneur.

Prison Professors, an Earning Freedom company, works alongside (not in place of) civil and criminal defense counsel to help clients proactively navigate through investigations and prosecutions. Our team also helps clients prepare mitigation and compliance strategies.

If you have any questions or are uncertain about any of the issues discussed in this post, schedule a call with our risk mitigation team to receive additional guidance. 

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